First slide

A New Series!

divider

I am very happy to announce that Night Shade Books will be publishing Ironfoot, the first volume of an historical fantasy series, The Enchanter General, set in Twelfth Century England, when Normans rule and Saxons are the underclass.  Durwin, a crippled Saxon lad, manages to cure an ancient enchantment, Spricest ðu, whose text has been corrupted.  It promptly prophecies murder in his future.  (And, as we all know, in fantasy, prophecies never lie.)

16 thoughts on “A New Series!”

  1. A burning question, how do you say ðu? I have never encountered the ð character in Braille before. My screen reader pronounces it “thoo” (with a th as in the or that, rather than a soft th as in through).

    1. Hi, Sean:
      Durwin, being a Saxon, speaks Anglo-Saxon, now usually called Old English, which contained two letters that have since disappeared. The one you mention, Đ or đ, is called eth and pronounced th. “Spricest ðu” means “speakest thou?” (The spells are named after their opening words.) The other letter is thorn, Þ or þ, and was pronounced much the same, although modern usage is to distinguish between them. I wrote some very simple notes on Anglo-Saxon at the start of Lord of the Fire Lands. (Simple because I am no expert.)
      Dave

      1. Thank you!
        I’m no linguist, but have been learning a lot about phonemes and representing speech so as to better adjust the voice on the computer when it encounters these things. I shall dig out my Lord of the Fire Lands (Brilliant book of course, Radgar is superb). Actually it’s an interesting point; the copy I have of that book was produced into Braille and the transcriptionist, rather than use the appropriate Braille code for what are archaic letters, seems to have just replaced them with modern English. I am going to have to buy an ebook from a mainstream source to more properly investigate.Thank you!
        I’m no linguist, but have been learning a lot about phonemes and representing speech so as to better adjust the voice on the computer when it encounters these things. I shall dig out my Lord of the Fire Lands (Brilliant book of course, Radgar is superb). Actually it’s an interesting point; the copy I have of that book was produced into Braille and the transcriptionist, rather than use the appropriate Braille code for what are archaic letters, seems to have just replaced them with modern English. I am going to have to buy an ebook from a mainstream source to more properly investigate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

+ 30 = 40